The Legends Interviews: Drs. Abouljoud and Brown

Henry Ford Hospital President and CEO Dr. John Popovich, Jr. interviews Dr. Marwan Abouljoud and Dr. Kimberly Brown in the next edition of “Interviews in Front of the Living Wall: Legends Interviews.” In this segment, Dr. Abouljoud, Director of the Henry Ford Transplant Institute, and Dr. Brown, Chief of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Associate Medical Director of the Henry Ford Transplant Institute discuss organ transplantation, treatment and the future of transplantation services.

“The Legends Interviews” segments were filmed in the Henry Ford Hospital Atrium. To view past videos, click the “Legends Interviews” tag at the bottom of this post.

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Waiting to Live Campaign

Did you know that roughly one-third of the more than 3,000 Michigan residents waiting for organ transplants live in Wayne County, yet only 25 percent of the county’s adults are registered organ, tissue and eye donors?

(By comparison, more than 37 percent of adults statewide and about 43 percent nationally are registered as donors.)

That’s a tremendous gap, one that our partner in organ donation, Gift of Life Michigan, hopes to close through its new ad campaign, “Waiting to Live – Wayne County.”

The campaign features five Wayne County residents – two of whom are Henry Ford Transplant Institute patients – all waiting for life-saving organ transplants.

Henry Ford Hospital has pledged our support to this campaign and our community by asking residents to consider adding their names to the Michigan Organ Donor Registry, a confidential database of people who want to give the gift of life.

I should also note that the Henry Ford Transplant Institute has joined Gift of Life Michigan, the Michigan Eye-Bank, the Michigan Health & Hospital Association and the Donate Life Coalition of Michigan to add one million names to the Michigan organ donor registry too.

As I’ve said before, transplantation of human organs is one of the great accomplishments of modern medical science.

Although still requiring lifelong care with medications and oversight, the transformation of patients, from failing organs to full of life, is truly remarkable. Continue reading

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