The Tradition of National Doctors’ Day

National Doctors’ Day dates back to March 30, 1933 in Winder, Georgia, when Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decided to set a day aside to honor physicians.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

It wasn’t until 60 years later that President George H.W. Bush signed Proclamation 6253, establishing National Doctors’ Day to “recognize our Nation’s physicians for their leadership in the prevention and treatment of illness and injury…”

Like the first observance in 1933, National Doctors’ day is still marked by patients thanking their physicians, mailing greeting cards, or sending flowers.

I want to take time to honor Dr. Hillier.  He delivered me and was our family physician when I was growing up in Troy in the 50’s.

In those days, Troy was a rural community and there were not a lot of doctors or health facilities there.  So, when we were sick, we went miles south on Rochester Road to the Palmer Woods area on Woodward to see Dr. Hillier.

I was very sick with tonsillitis.

My mom waited for my dad to come home from work, which was after 6 p.m. He took a look at me and said to call Dr. Hillier. Continue reading

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Celebrating National Doctors’ Day

“Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.”
– Henry Ford

This Saturday, March 30, we’ll honor and celebrate the work of physicians who serve our communities as part of National Doctors’ Day.

While it officially became a day of national recognition in 1991, the observance of National Doctors’ Day dates back to March 30, 1933 in Winder, Georgia, when Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decided to set a day aside to honor physicians.

Nearly 60 years later, President George H.W. Bush signed Proclamation 6253, establishing National Doctors’ Day to “recognize our Nation’s physicians for their leadership in the prevention and treatment of illness and injury…”

Traditionally, people celebrate the day by thanking their physicians, mailing greeting cards, or sending flowers.

The red carnation is commonly associated with the National Doctors’ Day. The first observance in 1933 included the mailing greeting cards and placing flowers on graves of deceased doctors. Continue reading

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