Rallying the Detroit Food Trucks

I was looking at an email blast last July promoting the 20th Anniversary of the Concert of Colors at the Max M. Fisher Music Center.

Rather than being drawn to the great artists like the Don Was Detroit All-Star Revue, Tito Puentes and George Clinton, I immediately looked at the Detroit-based food trucks that would be attending the concerts.

You can see how Maslow’s hierarchy works in the Popovich brain: Physiological needs (food, drink), stop there.

You also know that I love the past, and food trucks make me think of the great experiences I had when I was younger, in a distant century, far, far away.

Trucks like “the ice cream truck.” Ice cream just tasted better after running headlong to the curb and waving down the driver who looked like Steve Buscemi on a bad day.  Creamsicle, ice cream sandwiches – wow!

Or, seeing the food trucks outside of the auto plants (my grandfather called them “car shops”), serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner. Big men, gathered around the truck, to get coffee, donuts, sandwiches and the latest gossip before going on or off shift.

So the convergence of these needs, memories and Detroit-based pride created the idea: Henry Ford Hospital Food Truck Rally.

After a bit of thought and negotiation, our first rally happened on a cool, crisp fall day on the tennis courts on our hospital campus.

It’s not every day you can walk outside for lunch and enjoy some of Detroit’s finest, homemade food truck cuisine: spinach pierogi, braised beef short rib tacos, cookie monster ice cream and lightly fried dill pickle spears calledfrickles.”

While the above mentioned foods are certainly not on my published list of essential food groups for hospital employees, I may be willing to modify that previous pyramid to include the culinary delights of People’s Pierogi Collective, Treat Dreams, Concrete Cuisine and Jacques’ Tacos. Continue reading

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2-Year Anniversary, Part 1: Celebrating What We’ve Accomplished

 

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Eat This, Not That: Shadowing a Henry Ford Hospital Dietitian

It’s no secret that health and wellness is a hot topic of discussion, especially on Doc in the D.  Seems like a lot more of our employees and others are becoming more “engaged” in establishing new and healthy habits. 

So I thought it would be interesting to walk in the shoes of an expert who deals directly with health, wellness and one of our favorite topics on this blog…food.

I recently shadowed Rebecca Trepasso, a registered dietitian at Henry Ford Hospital, who cares for some of our sickest patients in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.

Rebecca is another great example of Henry Ford employees – committed, professional, expert and funny.

(I still am working on convincing her that pizza does have all major food groups represented and truly is the perfect food.  Once I do that, it is on to Buffalo wings and fries.)

But seriously…

Rebecca works daily with patients to educate them on their dietary needs and how to best follow the dietary plan created by their health care team.

She’s also a preceptor in the Henry Ford Hospital Dietetic Internship Program, mentoring promising students within the Dietary Department.

During our time together, Rebecca showed me how she uses information technology in caring for her patient case load, the many processes and steps she goes through daily to educate her patients, and how she supports students.

But her work doesn’t end there. Continue reading

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The Essential Food Groups for Hospital Employees

I will not claim to having performed an exhaustive study of the essential food groups that fuel the doctors, nurses and others working within a hospital. 

I have made several observations in the field as part of my due diligence and learning, and I feel comfortable sharing with you these elements, sans food pyramid.

The Essential Foods:

1. Donuts
2. Pizza
3. Coffee, Mountain Dew or other more exotic caffeinated energy beverages
4. Any fried food, most importantly French fries or chicken
5. Hamburgers
6. Chips, or high-fat, cheese-containing and/or salt-laden snacks

Preferably, meals are constructed to include at least three of the essential foods, fit into the pocket of a white coat, and can be eaten in less than four minutes. (Or, more scientifically, the intake rate of 12,000 calories per minute). 

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