Model G Has Patients Covered at Henry Ford Hospital

A few years ago, I blogged about my MRI experience as a patient at Henry Ford Hospital. I called the blog post “Tweets from Inside the MRI,” as I recanted my appointment in short, 40-character quips or “tweets.”

As you may recall, several of my “tweets” in that blog post were devoted to the much maligned hospital gown:


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Are any hospital gowns made for someone over 6 feet?

 

Dr. John Popovich @docinthed
Need two gowns, you don’t want to see what’s behind #youtube

 


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Who doesn’t look good in a thigh-length gown, black socks and loafers? Eat your heart out #GeorgeClooney!

 

All kidding aside, it was a great experience – the physicians, nurses, support staff and technicians were absolutely first rate.

But that hospital gown.

Well, now we have a solution that, thanks to the Henry Ford Innovation Institute. Continue reading

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The New Patient Gown

A couple of years ago, I posted on the blog – in 140 characters or less, as if I was live-tweeting from the hospital – about my experience as a patient undergoing an MRI.

You may recall a few of my “tweets” from that post: “Are any hospital gowns made for someone over 6 feet?” and “Need two gowns, you don’t want to see what’s behind #youtube.”

These are the same complaints we’ve heard for decades about the standard patient gown – it’s ill-fitting, uncomfortable and has a very drafty backside.

And now, we have a solution: A newly designed patient gown that’s comfortable, warm and keeps patient covered, yet still accessible to clinical staff.

Michael Forbes, a product designer at the Henry Ford Innovation Institute, talks with patient Ismail Khalil, M.D., a vascular surgeon from Lebanon who traveled to Henry Ford Hospital for a liver transplant. Dr. Khalil is wearing the new patient gown.

Michael Forbes, a product designer at the Henry Ford Innovation Institute, talks with patient Ismail Khalil, M.D., who traveled to Henry Ford Hospital from Lebanon for a liver transplant. Khalil is wearing the new gown.

The new patient gown – resembling a wrap-around robe that completely closes in the back and front – is being rolled out on several inpatient floors at Henry Ford Hospital.

It is among the first inventions to be made public by the Henry Ford Innovation Institute in collaboration with the College for Creative Studies.

The newly designed gown is:

  • Completely closed in the back, creating more privacy for patients
  • Made of a thicker, cotton/polyester blend material, which keeps patients warmer than the previous patient gowns
  • Double-breasted in the front, using three snaps, instead of ties, to close the gown
  • Intuitive in design, with different colored snaps and stitching along the left and right sides of the gown, making it easy for patients to put on
  • Accessible for IVs and other medical lines. The health care teams say it offers them uncompromised clinical access to the patient without needing to remove the gown

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Modern Innovation, Historic Building

On the Henry Ford Hospital Campus, we have some incredible historic buildings that we see and work in every day.

The main hospital, Clara Ford Pavilion and the “M” building are a few of the structures that have been part of the Campus for decades.

1925-SON-(42593)

The Henry Ford Hospital School of Nursing Dedication, 1925. In attendance were Henry Ford, Clara J. Ford, Edsel B Ford, Eleanor Clay Ford, Dr. Frank J. Sladen, Professor C.E.Winslow, nursing director, Katherine G. Kimmick, R.N. and other nursing staff members.

Did you know that the “M” building was once part of the original construction developed for the first Detroit General Hospital?

Through the years, our Facilities team, using their creativity and expertise, has been able to upgrade, resurface and restore many historic parts of the Campus.

Before: The former gym during construction.

Before: The former gym during construction.

In fact, the four base floors of the hospital units (I-H-A-B-F) were completed in the early 1920s; the floors currently provide support for the inpatient units residing on those floors.

The Clara Ford Pavilion’s first floor conference room in the Department of Medicine shows the grandeur of the old construction, and how restoration and modern upgrades can create spectacular results. Anyone who has been to Europe has seen what is possible for structures even older than ours.

When we were looking to house our Innovation Institute, we wanted to place it prominently on Campus.

After: The Innovation Institute.

After: The Innovation Institute.

Since Clara Ford Pavilion currently is being used for departmental and physician offices, the Education (“Old Ed”) building, located next door, seemed to match our needs.

The “Old Ed” building was designed between 1923-1925 by the Detroit architect Albert Kahn to house the teaching and recreational facilities for the nurses and hospital staff.

The dedication in 1925 was held in the second floor gymnasium, which also functioned as an auditorium (see archival photo above). Continue reading

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Work Beyond Our Walls

If you follow Doc in the D, you know that I talk a great deal about Henry Ford Hospital being “more than a hospital.”   

In my talks about Henry Ford, I often speak of the academic health sciences center that we represent. The values that are deeply imbedded in Henry Ford are learning and innovation.

Over the last several years, we have created a great deal of the underpinnings to support those values. 

Our relationship with Wayne State University, especially our major affiliation with its School of Medicine, has allowed us to tap into the creativity, enthusiasm and the academic culture driving a learning organization such as ours. 

The Henry Ford Innovation Institute was born from an idea, with our imagination as the only limitation of what can be created. 

It asked the question of all of us at Henry Ford:
“What would you build for the world?”

The short video posted above from the World Health Student Organization of Wayne State University School of Medicine shows the power of learning and innovation, as well as the importance of Henry Ford serving as a facilitator of great work beyond our walls.

In the video, you’ll see how a donation of Aquapaks from the Henry Ford Innovation Institute to the World Health Student Organization made an incredible impact on the village of Agua Blanca in Ecuador.

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If You Build It, They Will Innovate

When you type “innovation in Detroit” into a Google search, the results are a rather interesting mix of links about our city’s history (mostly related to automotive) and articles both doubting and touting the future potential of innovation creating new businesses, products and jobs in Detroit.

One link in particular that stood out was an article published a few years ago in the Huffington Post. The headline: Detroit – Innovation City?

And it’s a fair question. With all that Detroit has weathered, can a few scattered ideas change its image, create a hub for talent and develop a solid strategy for revival?

Today, we have an answer to that question: The Innovation Institute at Henry Ford, which officially opens today (Oct. 10) on the Henry Ford Hospital campus.

The Innovation Institute is an important step forward in creating an environment to foster new ideas in medicine, as well as find creative solutions to identify best processes in patient care.

But we aren’t taking the traditional route to innovation.

Think of it this way: Many of you have probably looked at some product in the hospital, your home, or other parts of your life and said, “I think this would work better if it was designed like this (insert your idea here).”

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