A Big Favor

To kick off the return of Doc in the D, I wanted to share something special that truly touched my heart. The journey we take in our professions is personal but also shared. Much of the shared experience is not technical; it is related to the humanity of our roles and calling.

Some among us can provide insights into this far better than others. They can describe the emotional subtleties, the push and pull on our professional and personal lives, and the fundamental thread of our connectivity with our patients.

A brilliant (and award winning) essay by one of our surgical residents, Dr. Ko Un Clara Park, captures this and needs no further introduction. Continue reading

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Doc in the D is Back!

“He’s ba-aa-a-a-ck.”

No, not Poltergeist II. Doc in the D is back.

After an almost six month hiatus, Doc in the D has returned. We all had to recharge the batteries after our centennial celebration that culminated in a magnificent Grand Ball.

Now it’s time for a new century of Henry Ford Hospital and to continue to share stories of our employees and our hospital. Continue reading

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Clara Ford & The School of Nursing

This week we celebrate the role of nursing in health care and at Henry Ford Hospital.

Henry Ford Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1927

Henry Ford Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1927, courtesy of the Conrad R. Lam Archives.

In previous blog posts, I’ve described the creation of the Henry Ford Medical Group, an idea that Henry Ford moved forward as influenced by meeting with the Mayo brothers.

Many of Henry’s other ideas about health care and the medical practices needed to support Detroit during Henry Ford Hospital’s formative years were directly influenced by his wife, Clara.

Most importantly, Clara was the major advocate of developing excellence in nursing that continues to this day at Henry Ford.

Being a great believer in the caring nature of nursing and its pivotal role in the medical care provided to patients, Clara was the driving force in developing the Henry Ford School of Nursing and Hygiene on the hospital campus.

The school included two new buildings, both designed by renowned architect, Albert Kahn: the 300-room Clara Ford Nurses Home (today’s Clara Ford Pavilion) and the Education Building (now home to the Innovation Institute).

Clara also worked closely with a designer to ensure that both the private rooms and the common areas were outfitted with precision.

Most notably, the parlor of the Clara Ford Nurses Home was elegantly designed with ornate chandeliers.

To get a feel for how magnificent the parlor, take a look at the 1978 film, “The Betsy,” which was filmed, in part, on the first floor of Clara Ford Nurses Home. In addition, the Education Building featured classrooms, a pool, squash courts and a gymnasium with a stage for special events.

In 1925, the School enrolled its first class of 93 students. Two classes were admitted each year, one in January and the other in September. The class size was limited to 100 students.

Women came from all over the U.S., Canada and Europe to attend the prestigious 28-month program. Students accepted into the tuition-free school lived free-of-charge at the Clara Ford Nurses Home. Continue reading

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Model G Has Patients Covered at Henry Ford Hospital

A few years ago, I blogged about my MRI experience as a patient at Henry Ford Hospital. I called the blog post “Tweets from Inside the MRI,” as I recanted my appointment in short, 40-character quips or “tweets.”

As you may recall, several of my “tweets” in that blog post were devoted to the much maligned hospital gown:


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Are any hospital gowns made for someone over 6 feet?

 

Dr. John Popovich @docinthed
Need two gowns, you don’t want to see what’s behind #youtube

 


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Who doesn’t look good in a thigh-length gown, black socks and loafers? Eat your heart out #GeorgeClooney!

 

All kidding aside, it was a great experience – the physicians, nurses, support staff and technicians were absolutely first rate.

But that hospital gown.

Well, now we have a solution that, thanks to the Henry Ford Innovation Institute. Continue reading

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A Renovation Nearly 100 Years in the Making

The new Henry Ford Hospital surgical lounge, nearly 100 years in the making, is finally complete and open for business.

But first, let’s review some history.

New Henry Ford Hospital Surgical Lounge

New Henry Ford Hospital Surgical Lounge

As I noted in my previous blog post, Henry Ford Hospital is entering its 100th year of operation.

The iconic building on the Boulevard, whose designer was Albert Wood, a young architect on the payroll of Ford Motor Company, was constructed by Albert A. Albrecht Company.

Construction started in 1917 and, on Dec. 21, 1921, patients were admitted to the new section of Henry Ford Hospital, the base four floors of our current hospital. Continue reading

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Our Patients in 1915

This week marks the beginning of Henry Ford Hospital’s 100th year of operation.

A few weeks ago, I was given a bound log book documenting the first 50 patients who were admitted to Henry Ford Hospital.

We had always acknowledged Oct. 1, 1915 as the first day of patients being admitted to Henry Ford.

This date is true for the actual completed hospital beds in the private-room building of Henry Ford Hospital, which today we call the “M” building.

Medical record log for Henry Ford Hospital's first documented patient.

Medical record log for Henry Ford Hospital’s first documented patient.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few patients, however, were actually admitted before that date to the basement area of the hospital in open ward converted space — among them, our first documented patient, a stock handler with chronic back and leg pain and a morphine addiction, who was admitted on July 13, 1915.

The medical records are quite impressive.

The same cursive writing of Henry Ford Hospital that we use today is noted at the top of each page.

The handwriting is meticulous, and clearly not written by a physician with deplorable handwriting, such as myself. Continue reading

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Baby Wings

A few “Baby Wings” and their parents at Henry Ford Hospital had a special visit today from one of the Detroit Red Wings, someone who has been with the NHL for nearly 20 years – Daniel Alfredsson.

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“Baby Wing” Thaddeus, who joined the world at HFH this week, sports his new Red Wing beanie with his mom and Alfredsson.

For those of you who do not follow hockey, Alfredsson is a near lock for a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Before he joined the Wings this year, he was captain of the Ottawa Senators from 1999-2013 with almost all franchise scoring records. He played for the Swedish National team 13 times and won an Olympic gold medal in 2006.

Alfredsson – joined by Sandy Pierce, CEO of FirstMerit Michigan and Chair of the HFHS Board, and FirstMerit Mascot Franklin the Moose – visited a couple of families on the HFH labor and delivery unit to officially launch our new “Baby Wings” program.

Dr. Munkarah, Sandy Pierce, Alfredsson and Franklin the FirstMerit moose with our team on H3.

Dr. Munkarah, Sandy Pierce, Alfredsson and Franklin the FirstMerit moose with our team on H3.

Continue reading

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Game On Cancer

Today is a great day for the City of Detroit.

The Detroit Tigers are set to play a pivotal game three of the ACLS against the Boston Red Sox at Comerica Park.

And next door at Ford Field, we announced a unique new partnership with another amazing Detroit establishment – the Detroit Lions – to raise $15 million during the next three years for cancer research at the Josephine Ford Cancer Institute.

Our campaign is called “Game on Cancer,” and it offers a fun and creative way to get Lions fans and the community to join our “team” in the fight against cancer through an interactive 3D website of Ford Field.

Executive chairman of Ford Motor Company Bill Ford Jr. and his wife, Lisa, serve as the honorary co-chairs for “Game on Cancer.”

Former Detroit Lions wide receiver Herman Moore is helping to promote the campaign too by starring in the above TV commercial that “tackles” cancer.

“Game on Cancer” will officially launch Sunday, Oct. 20 when the Detroit Lions play the Cincinnati Bengals at Ford Field, coinciding with the Detroit Lions NFL national game day for breast cancer awareness.

Here’s how you can get in on the Game on Cancer: Continue reading

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Men Who Cook in the “D”

This year marked another successful “Men Who Cook” event on the Henry Ford Hospital campus.

MWC_pano_01

The men of Henry Ford and other companies across metro Detroit on Wednesday dished out Detroit’s finest creations – street tacos, chili dogs, hot wings, Vernors floats, Sanders hot fudge sundaes (for purposes of the greater good, we have suspended any and all healthy eating restrictions), and so much more – to raise funds for the Tom Groth Patient Medical Needs Fund.

The Center for Cancer Surgery serving up "pothole pot stickers"

The Center for Cancer Surgery team serving up “pothole pot stickers”

From 2004 – 2012, Men Who Cook has raised approximately $2.1 million for the Tom Groth Patient Medical Needs Fund, which provides health care, medication, equipment, medical supplies and social services to uninsured and underinsured patients.

All of you are aware of the increasing difficulty these patients and families face.

This fund is particularly for patients who do not have the resources for pay for basic medical needs. The Tom Groth Patient Medical Needs Fund is a vital contributor to the health and wellness of our patients, allowing us to provide:

  • $5 for the purchase of one week of oral blood pressure medicine
  • $75 for the purchase of a walker and safe ride home
  • $100 for the purchase of one day’s worth of IV antibiotics

I am sure Tom Groth, who was a great administrator and even better person, was smiling once again at the event to support the fund that he inspired. Continue reading

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The New Patient Gown

A couple of years ago, I posted on the blog – in 140 characters or less, as if I was live-tweeting from the hospital – about my experience as a patient undergoing an MRI.

You may recall a few of my “tweets” from that post: “Are any hospital gowns made for someone over 6 feet?” and “Need two gowns, you don’t want to see what’s behind #youtube.”

These are the same complaints we’ve heard for decades about the standard patient gown – it’s ill-fitting, uncomfortable and has a very drafty backside.

And now, we have a solution: A newly designed patient gown that’s comfortable, warm and keeps patient covered, yet still accessible to clinical staff.

Michael Forbes, a product designer at the Henry Ford Innovation Institute, talks with patient Ismail Khalil, M.D., a vascular surgeon from Lebanon who traveled to Henry Ford Hospital for a liver transplant. Dr. Khalil is wearing the new patient gown.

Michael Forbes, a product designer at the Henry Ford Innovation Institute, talks with patient Ismail Khalil, M.D., who traveled to Henry Ford Hospital from Lebanon for a liver transplant. Khalil is wearing the new gown.

The new patient gown – resembling a wrap-around robe that completely closes in the back and front – is being rolled out on several inpatient floors at Henry Ford Hospital.

It is among the first inventions to be made public by the Henry Ford Innovation Institute in collaboration with the College for Creative Studies.

The newly designed gown is:

  • Completely closed in the back, creating more privacy for patients
  • Made of a thicker, cotton/polyester blend material, which keeps patients warmer than the previous patient gowns
  • Double-breasted in the front, using three snaps, instead of ties, to close the gown
  • Intuitive in design, with different colored snaps and stitching along the left and right sides of the gown, making it easy for patients to put on
  • Accessible for IVs and other medical lines. The health care teams say it offers them uncompromised clinical access to the patient without needing to remove the gown

Continue reading

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