Living Wall Interviews: What attracted you to your current position?

Doc in the D’s Dr. John Popovich interviews Henry Ford Hospital staff and physicians to learn why they chose their current positions. Their responses are interesting and speak to the reason we are all here.

The “Interviews in front of the Living Wall” segments were filmed in the hospital’s atrium – in front of the Living Wall – and offers a glimpse into the lives of Henry Ford Hospital physicians and staff outside of the normal environments in which you may be used to seeing them. To view past videos, click the “Living Wall Interviews” tag at the bottom of this post.

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Living Wall Interview with Audrey Bondar

In the next edition of the new Doc in the D segment, “Interviews in front of the Living Wall,” Dr. John Popovich spends a few minutes getting to know Henry Ford Hospital Sladen Librarian Audrey Bondar who is retiring this month.

The “Interviews in front of the Living Wall” segments were filmed in the hospital’s atrium – in front of the Living Wall – and offers a glimpse into the lives of Henry Ford Hospital physicians and staff outside of the normal environments in which you may be used to seeing them. To view past videos, click the “Living Wall Interviews” tag at the bottom of this post.

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Interviews in front of the Living Wall

We created a new Doc in the D segment to help you get to know our Henry Ford Hospital physicians and staff outside of the normal medical and academic environments in which you may be used to seeing them. “Interviews in front of the Living Wall” was filmed in the hospital’s atrium as indicated – in front of the Living Wall. Our team put together this fun video to give you a taste for what’s to come. Watch for full interviews with each staff member over the next few months. Enjoy!

To view other “Interviews in front of the Living Wall” segments, click the “Living Wall Interviews” tag at the bottom of this post.

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Workplace violence in a sanctuary of healing

The unfortunate but extraordinarily serious problem.

The emotions that are heightened during health care encounters and the
number of patients with behavioral issues make healthcare workers at a significantly increased risk for workplace violence. In fact, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reported from 2002 to 2013 that serious workplace violence resulting in an injured worker requiring days off to recuperate were four times more common in healthcare than in private industry.

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Farewell to the one who made things happen

Our individual professional success is greatly dependent on the many people who assist and partner with us along the way. To arrange our days, to keep us on track, and to serve to make us more effective in what we do. To represent us and to cheerlead for us. To make us far better than we can be when left to our own devices.

My great fortune is to have had Pat Pillon as my right hand. No one has had a greater impact on my ability to get things done during my HFH career.

Pat Pillon (front row, fifth left) is pictured with her husband and colleagues at her retirement party.

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The Yuck Factor

All of us in health care know the importance of cleaning and washing our hands when we care for others. This simple act can prevent injury to patients and save lives.

I am going to give you another reason to wash your hands.

Take a good look at the bacterial cultures of the hands of two of our employees. Hand2You can see those areas that represent growth of bacteria. Bacteria that can be transmitted to others, including our patients, our co-workers, our friends, our spouses, our children and ourselves.

This phenomenon qualifies by a very precise scientific term, YUCK. Continue reading

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Henry Ford at 100

The year, 1915…

The one millionth Model T rolled off the assembly line at Ford Motor Company.

Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas A. Watson conducted the first cross-coastal telephone conversation between New York and San Francisco.

A German U-boat submarine sunk the Lusitania.

Babe Ruth hit his first major league home run, and the Tigers narrowly lost the AL pennant to the Red Sox.

Henry Ford Hospital opened as a 48-bed facility in Detroit.

Not that many institutions last 100 years.

Henry Ford Hospital

Henry Ford Hospital. Image courtesy of the Conrad R. Lam Archives

It’s unbelievable at times to look back at the events of 1915, which point out how far we have come.

From the Model T to the Shelby Cobra, from the first phone call to cell phones, from the Tigers not winning to the pennant to…well, you get the picture.

Since Henry Ford Hospital officially opened on Oct. 1, 1915, each page of our history has been filled with groundbreaking achievements in medical science and patient care, all made possible by the amazingly talented people who walk the halls of Henry Ford Hospital. Continue reading

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A Celebration a Century in the Making

Wow, what a day!

Today marks our 100th year of operation.

On July 13, 1915, the first patient was admitted to Henry Ford Hospital, long before the hospital was “officially” ready to receive patients on Oct. 1, 1915.

Henry Ford Health System's first-ever float, which will make its debut in America's Thanksgiving Day Parade presented by Art Van.

Henry Ford Health System’s first-ever float, which will make its debut in America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade presented by Art Van.

As I wrote in a post on Doc in the D one year ago, several patients were admitted to the basement area of the unfinished hospital (today’s M-Unit) because of the great needs of patients in our city at that time.

Since then, Henry Ford Hospital, and subsequently Henry Ford Health System, has continuously worked to transform health care for our patients, most notably through the development of the Henry Ford Medical Group, and our significant role in medical education, research and innovation.

None of this would be possible, however, without our employees.

Today marked the first of many employee events scheduled throughout Henry Ford Health System to celebrate our 100 year anniversary.

Today marked the first of many employee events scheduled throughout Henry Ford Health System to celebrate our 100 year anniversary.

You are the lifeblood of this institution. Your commitment is truly the reason why so many of us have spent the entirety of our careers here, myself included.

Today we had the opportunity to celebrate and thank you – for your tireless work and unwavering dedication – at the first of many employee events to commemorate our 100 year anniversary scheduled through the end of August across Henry Ford Health System. Continue reading

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Clara Ford & The School of Nursing

This week we celebrate the role of nursing in health care and at Henry Ford Hospital.

Henry Ford Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1927

Henry Ford Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1927, courtesy of the Conrad R. Lam Archives.

In previous blog posts, I’ve described the creation of the Henry Ford Medical Group, an idea that Henry Ford moved forward as influenced by meeting with the Mayo brothers.

Many of Henry’s other ideas about health care and the medical practices needed to support Detroit during Henry Ford Hospital’s formative years were directly influenced by his wife, Clara.

Most importantly, Clara was the major advocate of developing excellence in nursing that continues to this day at Henry Ford.

Being a great believer in the caring nature of nursing and its pivotal role in the medical care provided to patients, Clara was the driving force in developing the Henry Ford School of Nursing and Hygiene on the hospital campus.

The school included two new buildings, both designed by renowned architect, Albert Kahn: the 300-room Clara Ford Nurses Home (today’s Clara Ford Pavilion) and the Education Building (now home to the Innovation Institute).

Clara also worked closely with a designer to ensure that both the private rooms and the common areas were outfitted with precision.

Most notably, the parlor of the Clara Ford Nurses Home was elegantly designed with ornate chandeliers.

To get a feel for how magnificent the parlor, take a look at the 1978 film, “The Betsy,” which was filmed, in part, on the first floor of Clara Ford Nurses Home. In addition, the Education Building featured classrooms, a pool, squash courts and a gymnasium with a stage for special events.

In 1925, the School enrolled its first class of 93 students. Two classes were admitted each year, one in January and the other in September. The class size was limited to 100 students.

Women came from all over the U.S., Canada and Europe to attend the prestigious 28-month program. Students accepted into the tuition-free school lived free-of-charge at the Clara Ford Nurses Home. Continue reading

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“Back to the Future” Part 3

In the final segment of our three-part vodcast series on the history of Henry Ford Hospital and Health System, HFHS CEO Nancy Schlichting and I discuss what’s ahead for Henry Ford and our goals for the future.

Undoubtedly, we believe our rich history will continue to inspire the future at Henry Ford – through cutting-edge medical innovations and collaborative partnerships, to our deep commitment to the city we’ve called home for 100 years, in good times and often challenging times.

Henry Ford stood with Detroit for 100 years and has proudly been a part of its resurrection – not only as a provider and beacon for what’s good about health care institutions, but also as a very strong economic engine to the city.

We certainly have a lot to look forward to as we look back on our incredible history in celebration of Henry Ford’s 100 Year Anniversary. Continue reading

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