Reduce barriers to health care with a “yes vote”

Cars. This is how we get to work, run errands, visit family and take our kids to school.

A “yes vote” for the Regional Transit Authority Master Plan will improve access to health care for everyone.

A “yes vote” for the Regional Transit Authority Master Plan will improve access to health care for everyone.

Well, not all of us.

Approximately 26 percent of Detroit households are without a vehicle.

So how do they handle the basics like shopping for healthy food, attending doctor appointments or filling prescriptions?

That’s the $3 billion question and one we hope to solve with a regional transportation plan.

Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Detroit at 315: A reflection of progress

During the past 315 years, Detroit has been through its share of ups and downs. Some you know about and some you probably don’t. What most of you do realize is the incredible resiliency of this city and the people who proudly call themselves Detroiters. Some term us “survivors.” I like to think of us fighters who get off the mat to battle again.

Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Henry Ford Grand Ball: Century Edition

106391_KAG_5317Thank you to all in attendance at the Henry Ford Grand Ball, Century edition, this last weekend.

The night was magical, and a fitting ending to our yearlong celebration.

I would only have wished that all of the Henry Ford Health System team could have been present for the event.

Governor Rick Snyder presents a special tribute to Henry Ford Health System for its 100 years of service.

Governor Rick Snyder presents a special tribute to Henry Ford Health System for its 100 years of service.

The incredible support from the community as a whole and the Ford family, in particular, inspires all of us and is a reminder of what we represent in the community and the history of the last 100 years.

This now refocuses our attention on the next 100 years for our organization. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Henry Ford at 100

The year, 1915…

The one millionth Model T rolled off the assembly line at Ford Motor Company.

Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas A. Watson conducted the first cross-coastal telephone conversation between New York and San Francisco.

A German U-boat submarine sunk the Lusitania.

Babe Ruth hit his first major league home run, and the Tigers narrowly lost the AL pennant to the Red Sox.

Henry Ford Hospital opened as a 48-bed facility in Detroit.

Not that many institutions last 100 years.

Henry Ford Hospital

Henry Ford Hospital. Image courtesy of the Conrad R. Lam Archives

It’s unbelievable at times to look back at the events of 1915, which point out how far we have come.

From the Model T to the Shelby Cobra, from the first phone call to cell phones, from the Tigers not winning to the pennant to…well, you get the picture.

Since Henry Ford Hospital officially opened on Oct. 1, 1915, each page of our history has been filled with groundbreaking achievements in medical science and patient care, all made possible by the amazingly talented people who walk the halls of Henry Ford Hospital. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Building Our Next Century

Make no little plans…Make big plans; aim high in hope and work, remembering that a noble, logical diagram once recorded will not die, but long after we are gone be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistence…

That quote by Daniel Hudson Burnham, among my favorites, could not be truer this week, as we celebrate 100 years since the doors to Henry Ford Hospital officially opened on Oct. 1, 1915, and we look forward to the “big plans” we’ve made for our next century in Detroit.

The big plans: A new cancer center and neighborhood improvement initiative on 300 acres south of W. Grand Blvd. and north of I-94.

Conceptual drawing of the planned cancer center.

Conceptual drawing of the planned cancer center.

The planned five-story, 144,000 square-foot cancer center will include a rooftop garden and skywalk to connect it to Henry Ford Hospital, marking another key moment in our history and in the city’s revitalization.

We’re creating a world-class cancer facility supporting the expertise of the Henry Ford Medical Group in the care of cancer patients. Opening is expected in summer 2018.

The facility will be modern in its technology and, most importantly, address the physical and emotional needs of our cancer patients by offering greater flexibility with their care, and expanded support services for the duration of their disease. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

A Celebration a Century in the Making

Wow, what a day!

Today marks our 100th year of operation.

On July 13, 1915, the first patient was admitted to Henry Ford Hospital, long before the hospital was “officially” ready to receive patients on Oct. 1, 1915.

Henry Ford Health System's first-ever float, which will make its debut in America's Thanksgiving Day Parade presented by Art Van.

Henry Ford Health System’s first-ever float, which will make its debut in America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade presented by Art Van.

As I wrote in a post on Doc in the D one year ago, several patients were admitted to the basement area of the unfinished hospital (today’s M-Unit) because of the great needs of patients in our city at that time.

Since then, Henry Ford Hospital, and subsequently Henry Ford Health System, has continuously worked to transform health care for our patients, most notably through the development of the Henry Ford Medical Group, and our significant role in medical education, research and innovation.

None of this would be possible, however, without our employees.

Today marked the first of many employee events scheduled throughout Henry Ford Health System to celebrate our 100 year anniversary.

Today marked the first of many employee events scheduled throughout Henry Ford Health System to celebrate our 100 year anniversary.

You are the lifeblood of this institution. Your commitment is truly the reason why so many of us have spent the entirety of our careers here, myself included.

Today we had the opportunity to celebrate and thank you – for your tireless work and unwavering dedication – at the first of many employee events to commemorate our 100 year anniversary scheduled through the end of August across Henry Ford Health System. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Celebrating a “Century of Life” at Detroit Historical Museum

It’s one thing to look at photos and read about our history.

It’s quite another to have the opportunity to walk through the past 10 decades and experience our institution’s driving, sustaining force in clinical care, research, medical education and innovation.

In celebration of the 100-year anniversary, the Detroit Historical Museum has offered the opportunity to do just that with the opening of the special exhibit “Henry Ford Health System: 100 Years Measured in Life.”

On display in the museum’s Community Gallery through Jan. 3, 2016, the exhibit chronicles the birth and development of Henry Ford Hospital, one Detroit’s best-known and one of the nation’s most-respected healthcare institutions.

The exhibit begins in 1915 with auto pioneer Henry Ford taking control of the stalled 48-bed Detroit General Hospital project (today’s Henry Ford Hospital).

Nancy Schlichting, Henry Ford III, the great-great grandson of our hospital's founder, and I tour the exhibit at the Detroit Historical Museum.

Nancy Schlichting, Henry Ford III, the great-great grandson of our hospital’s founder, and I tour the exhibit at the Detroit Historical Museum.

It tracks the health system’s century of growth with 100 stories of transforming health and life through medical innovation and unwavering dedication to quality and community.

I had the opportunity to visit the exhibit last week.

I was blown away by the experience – the attention to detail, the historic artifacts, incredible images and interactive displays. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

Model G Has Patients Covered at Henry Ford Hospital

A few years ago, I blogged about my MRI experience as a patient at Henry Ford Hospital. I called the blog post “Tweets from Inside the MRI,” as I recanted my appointment in short, 40-character quips or “tweets.”

As you may recall, several of my “tweets” in that blog post were devoted to the much maligned hospital gown:


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Are any hospital gowns made for someone over 6 feet?

 

Dr. John Popovich @docinthed
Need two gowns, you don’t want to see what’s behind #youtube

 


Dr. John Popovich
@docinthed
Who doesn’t look good in a thigh-length gown, black socks and loafers? Eat your heart out #GeorgeClooney!

 

All kidding aside, it was a great experience – the physicians, nurses, support staff and technicians were absolutely first rate.

But that hospital gown.

Well, now we have a solution that, thanks to the Henry Ford Innovation Institute. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

The Cornerstone of Henry Ford Hospital

When Henry Ford took control of the stalled Detroit General Hospital project in 1914, he was left with an incomplete building on the hospital campus. It was an empty shell with no windows, battered by Michigan’s harsh weather.

The unfinished Patient Services Building, c. 1914. (From the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01-014)

The unfinished Patient Services Building, c. 1914. (From the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01-014)

Regardless, Ford was determined to complete the building and assigned the task to his personal secretary Ernest G. Liebold, who became the hospital’s first chief administrator.

With no previous hospital experience, Leibold set out to bring in new architects and quickly finish the facility, and to plan the future.

The original hospital building was very small; it was only designed to house 90 beds.

Liebold was concerned the hospital would fail to meet the great health care needs of the city – or be able to operate in the black – with so few beds, especially since the on-campus power plant, service building and kitchen were capable of serving a hospital of 500.

Prior to completion of the first patient care building, patients were admitted to an open ward in the basement of the current “M” unit, which was to become the private-room building of Henry Ford Hospital.

As you may recall from a prior Doc in the D blog post on this topic, most patients admitted to the basement ward were afflicted with a variety of substance abuse issues, many with serious consequences of narcotics. The first such patient was admitted on July 13, 1915.

On Oct. 1, 1915 the hospital beds in the private-room building of Henry Ford Hospital was completed. The first patient admitted had a diagnosis of erysipelas of the upper extremity, essentially a bacterial infection of the soft tissues. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D:

The First Wave of Physicians: Building a World-Class Hospital Staff

“If the hospital was to be supported by Mr. Ford and bear his name, it ought to be run differently than any other hospital.… The other hospitals to my mind were operated largely as a boarding house for the doctors’ patients. While they had members of their own staff, they were men who didn’t contribute actively toward the policy of the institution. It seemed the most prominent outside doctors were the ones who had the most to say in running the institution. That contributed largely to internal politics and things of that sort.

“I didn’t feel we ought to have that in any institution Mr. Ford had anything to do with.”

  • Ernest Liebold, from the Benson Ford Research Center at The Henry Ford in Dearborn, and quoted in the book, “Henry Ford Health System: A 100 Year Legacy”

When Henry Ford took control of the stalled Detroit General Hospital project in 1914, his name was synonymous with innovation: mass production, the moving assembly line and the $5 work day at Ford Motor Company.

The first Henry Ford Hospital staff. From left, first row (both shoes visible): Dr. Charles H. Watt, Dr. Frank J. Sladen, Dr. Roy D. McClure, Ernest G. Liebold, John N.E. Brown, and Dr. F. Janney Smith. Back row: Dr. John K. Ormond, unknown, Dr. Russell Haden, Dr. David R. Murchison, and Dr. Irvin L. Barclay. c. 1916 (Detail from the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01.011.)

The first Henry Ford Hospital staff. From left, first row (both shoes visible): Dr. Charles H. Watt, Dr. Frank J. Sladen, Dr. Roy D. McClure, Ernest G. Liebold, John N.E. Brown, and Dr. F. Janney Smith. Back row: Dr. John K. Ormond, unknown, Dr. Russell Haden, Dr. David R. Murchison, and Dr. Irvin L. Barclay. c. 1916 (Detail from the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01.011.)

It’s no surprise that a hospital bearing his name would be rooted in new ideas, making it different from other hospitals of the time, even if some those innovative ideas – including a closed medical group and standardized patient fees – were initially met with sharp criticism in the medical community.

As would be expected, Mr. Ford strongly influenced the concept for the staff of Henry Ford Hospital, but he had no significant knowledge as where to find the physicians that were essential to fulfill his ideas.

That is where the influence of Johns Hopkins was so vital in the formative years of the hospital and had direct impact on the subsequent mission of the organization.

One must remember that in the late 1800s and early 1900s, many medical schools were apprenticeships with minimal formal curriculum and training. These medical schools were often privately owned by a few physicians and were merely two-year trade schools.

This was a time of “quacks” and “quackery,” which greatly affected the respect of the profession and the benefit that medicine could uniformly provide to the population. Continue reading

Share Doc in the D: