Doc in the D’s Favorite Business Books

Read, read, and read. I read all the time. As much and as often as I can. Newspapers, books, usually old school real paper, but on the Kindle and iPad as well. Reading provides the experiences that you cannot often have yourself, and an opportunity to stimulate your own thoughts and to learn from others.

In the leadership and business realm, I am often asked about which books have influenced me the most. Not the “best” business books of all time, but those that have stimulated me to form my opinions about the direction that we need to go for success.

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The Yuck Factor

All of us in health care know the importance of cleaning and washing our hands when we care for others. This simple act can prevent injury to patients and save lives.

I am going to give you another reason to wash your hands.

Take a good look at the bacterial cultures of the hands of two of our employees. Hand2You can see those areas that represent growth of bacteria. Bacteria that can be transmitted to others, including our patients, our co-workers, our friends, our spouses, our children and ourselves.

This phenomenon qualifies by a very precise scientific term, YUCK. Continue reading

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A Big Favor

To kick off the return of Doc in the D, I wanted to share something special that truly touched my heart. The journey we take in our professions is personal but also shared. Much of the shared experience is not technical; it is related to the humanity of our roles and calling.

Some among us can provide insights into this far better than others. They can describe the emotional subtleties, the push and pull on our professional and personal lives, and the fundamental thread of our connectivity with our patients.

A brilliant (and award winning) essay by one of our surgical residents, Dr. Ko Un Clara Park, captures this and needs no further introduction. Continue reading

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Doc in the D is Back!

“He’s ba-aa-a-a-ck.”

No, not Poltergeist II. Doc in the D is back.

After an almost six month hiatus, Doc in the D has returned. We all had to recharge the batteries after our centennial celebration that culminated in a magnificent Grand Ball.

Now it’s time for a new century of Henry Ford Hospital and to continue to share stories of our employees and our hospital. Continue reading

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2016: Focused On Our Destiny

2016 holiday card front“Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”

  • William Jennings Bryan

It’s become an annual tradition each year that I’ve been President and CEO of Henry Ford Hospital to send my colleagues and my team a New Year’s card with a special – and inspiring – message for the New Year.

After celebrating our 100th anniversary in 2015, it is important that we look to the future in 2016 – our destiny. Continue reading

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The First Wave of Physicians: Building a World-Class Hospital Staff

“If the hospital was to be supported by Mr. Ford and bear his name, it ought to be run differently than any other hospital.… The other hospitals to my mind were operated largely as a boarding house for the doctors’ patients. While they had members of their own staff, they were men who didn’t contribute actively toward the policy of the institution. It seemed the most prominent outside doctors were the ones who had the most to say in running the institution. That contributed largely to internal politics and things of that sort.

“I didn’t feel we ought to have that in any institution Mr. Ford had anything to do with.”

  • Ernest Liebold, from the Benson Ford Research Center at The Henry Ford in Dearborn, and quoted in the book, “Henry Ford Health System: A 100 Year Legacy”

When Henry Ford took control of the stalled Detroit General Hospital project in 1914, his name was synonymous with innovation: mass production, the moving assembly line and the $5 work day at Ford Motor Company.

The first Henry Ford Hospital staff. From left, first row (both shoes visible): Dr. Charles H. Watt, Dr. Frank J. Sladen, Dr. Roy D. McClure, Ernest G. Liebold, John N.E. Brown, and Dr. F. Janney Smith. Back row: Dr. John K. Ormond, unknown, Dr. Russell Haden, Dr. David R. Murchison, and Dr. Irvin L. Barclay. c. 1916 (Detail from the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01.011.)

The first Henry Ford Hospital staff. From left, first row (both shoes visible): Dr. Charles H. Watt, Dr. Frank J. Sladen, Dr. Roy D. McClure, Ernest G. Liebold, John N.E. Brown, and Dr. F. Janney Smith. Back row: Dr. John K. Ormond, unknown, Dr. Russell Haden, Dr. David R. Murchison, and Dr. Irvin L. Barclay. c. 1916 (Detail from the Conrad R. Lam Collection, Henry Ford Health System. ID=01.011.)

It’s no surprise that a hospital bearing his name would be rooted in new ideas, making it different from other hospitals of the time, even if some those innovative ideas – including a closed medical group and standardized patient fees – were initially met with sharp criticism in the medical community.

As would be expected, Mr. Ford strongly influenced the concept for the staff of Henry Ford Hospital, but he had no significant knowledge as where to find the physicians that were essential to fulfill his ideas.

That is where the influence of Johns Hopkins was so vital in the formative years of the hospital and had direct impact on the subsequent mission of the organization.

One must remember that in the late 1800s and early 1900s, many medical schools were apprenticeships with minimal formal curriculum and training. These medical schools were often privately owned by a few physicians and were merely two-year trade schools.

This was a time of “quacks” and “quackery,” which greatly affected the respect of the profession and the benefit that medicine could uniformly provide to the population. Continue reading

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2015: A Year for Transformation

TRANSFORM (verb): to change (something) completely and usually in a good way; to make a thorough or dramatic change in the form, appearance, or character of.

NYcard_frontEach year that I’ve been President and CEO of Henry Ford Hospital, I’ve made it a tradition to send my colleagues and my team a New Year’s card with a very special message.

While I was not able to send my card for 2015 to all of you, I wanted to share with each of you my hopes for the New Year.

Our centennial year will one in which Henry Ford Hospital and the Health System continue to perform our transformational work in the delivery of health care.

We have a tremendous opportunity to capitalize on our economic development work in transforming our campus and immediate community.

But my sincerest hope is that each of you take 2015 to transform yourself and those around you, in the ways that provide each of you the greatest fulfillment.

Below is my New Year’s card, which I now share with you.

Happy New Year!

NYcard_inside

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Cross-Border Collaboration Summit

One of Henry Ford’s best-known quotes is the following: “Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success.”

Those words still hold true today.

His quote speaks to the importance of building relationships and identifying opportunities for collaboration; not just within our System but by working with other organizations within health care, our city and beyond.

Cross-Border Summit

The Cross-Border Summit was held in the Henry Ford Innovation Institute.

Working together is where you find success – and opportunity.

Such an opportunity arose with the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University in Ontario, Canada.

I have been working to develop collaborative opportunities in clinical care, education, research and innovation with our colleagues “south of the border,” down Canada way.

In prior blogs, I have written about the great work being done to provide support for certain clinical situations with hospitals and providers in Essex County.

After conversations with hospitals, educators, and private and governmental officials, we all felt there were many additional areas of work to consider, leveraging the resources and talents we have collectively.

In parallel with the work we had been doing, the remarkable dean of the Schulich School of Medicine, Dr. Michael Strong, and his leadership team took this concept one step further and extended their outreaching global initiatives to cross border work with Detroit.

This led to Henry Ford. Continue reading

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The Tradition of National Doctors’ Day

National Doctors’ Day dates back to March 30, 1933 in Winder, Georgia, when Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decided to set a day aside to honor physicians.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

It wasn’t until 60 years later that President George H.W. Bush signed Proclamation 6253, establishing National Doctors’ Day to “recognize our Nation’s physicians for their leadership in the prevention and treatment of illness and injury…”

Like the first observance in 1933, National Doctors’ day is still marked by patients thanking their physicians, mailing greeting cards, or sending flowers.

I want to take time to honor Dr. Hillier.  He delivered me and was our family physician when I was growing up in Troy in the 50’s.

In those days, Troy was a rural community and there were not a lot of doctors or health facilities there.  So, when we were sick, we went miles south on Rochester Road to the Palmer Woods area on Woodward to see Dr. Hillier.

I was very sick with tonsillitis.

My mom waited for my dad to come home from work, which was after 6 p.m. He took a look at me and said to call Dr. Hillier. Continue reading

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The Heart of Henry Ford Hospital

February is American Heart Month, offering a remarkable opportunity to raise awareness about the country’s leading cause of death among both men and women, and to educate our community about preventing and controlling heart disease.

The Heart & Vascular team "Go Red" in support of women's heart health last Friday.

The Heart & Vascular team “Go Red” in support of women’s heart health last Friday.

With all of the work being done by our hospital team in support of American Heart Month, I wanted to take a moment to recognize the incredible work they do each and every day of the year to keep Henry Ford Hospital at the forefront of heart and vascular care and cutting-edge treatments.

Looking back on the past year, the Edith and Benson Ford Heart & Vascular Institute had some remarkable accomplishments.

Among our “firsts” in 2013:

– Performing a world-first transcaval TAVR to create a new route to the heart by temporarily connecting major blood vessels that do not normally intersect. The Structural Heart team, led by Dr. William O’Neill, is pioneering new methods to reach and repair damaged heart valves seemingly every day.

– First in the U.S. to implant an aortic replacement heart valve in the mitral valve. Continue reading

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