It’s the Little Things (and the Routine Things) That Count

Every day I hear a patient care story at Henry Ford Hospital that absolutely inspires me and fills me with pride. 

Henry Ford Hospital teams work to bring water into the hospital during the August 2003 power outage.

These are often heroic efforts of clinical expertise and team work, with many of our people working against all odds to perform care that saves a patient from what appears to be an impossible situation. These “miracles on the Boulevard” seem almost routine.

Times of crisis also seem to bring out the best in Henry Ford. 

I noticed this years ago when we lost electricity on Campus on two occasions. 

You could not have had a group of people working together more incredibly to overcome not only the obstacles of minimum electrical power, but the even greater challenges of inadequate water so needed for thirst and cleanliness.

I sit back in awe of our people at these times.

Where do we falter?

What is remarkable is that when we fail, it is in the little things or the routine things that we need to perform on a daily basis. The concentrated efforts and energy during a crisis do not always translate as well to our daily tasks.

Not that it is easy to have these bursts of focus at all times. 

As a physician once told me, you can sprint for periods, but you can’t run a marathon by sprinting. It takes a different approach and mindset.

Much of health care is a marathon. Repetitive, frequent, routine, if you will. 

No fan fare in our employee newsletter and no flurry of congratulatory emails on a remarkable effort.

Our true business challenge is to relentlessly focus on day-to-day patient care and to do it as well as it can be done.  It is the most important element to ensure our success as a hospital.

Yet these daily acts – the ones that we must do – count just as much as all of our photo-op moments. 

The greetings, the explanations, the thank you’s, the acts of kindness, the hand washing, the diligent documentation, the instruction for care, and the activities that fill our days.

These add up to how we are perceived by our patients and families, our providing of safe and high quality care, and creating the welcoming and healing environment that is so important to our patients as well as our care providers.

So let’s celebrate the remarkable achievements that we perform, but remember the importance of each of the little things we do on a daily basis for our patients and each other. 

Let’s strive to meet the challenges and our goal of providing these each time, every time, every patient, every encounter.

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