Bridging the Work-Life Balance in Midtown

We’ve all been here: You leave the hospital after a long day of work and think, “my day’s not even close to being over yet.”

You’re running on low energy and still have to stop to get an oil change, look into a new doggie daycare and set-up a birthday dinner for a friend – and don’t forget the gift!

Midtown Concierge Office at HFH

Monica Sanders and Laurie Walker are ready to help you in the Midtown Concierge office in the hospital.

With our very busy work and personal lives, we all could use an extra hand in getting things done each day.

Recognizing that our hospital employees need a healthy work-life balance to be able to deliver the best possible care to our patients and their families, we’ve been working on special program for a while to help make life a little easier.

We’ve partnered with Midtown Detroit, Inc. and Balance Concierge to create Midtown Concierge, a service that works with local Midtown and City of Detroit businesses to provide goods and services to Henry Ford Hospital campus employees, often at a discounted rate.

Through Balance Concierge, Midtown Concierge offers personal assistance to hospital employees for routine tasks that often seem overwhelming when combined with a busy work and personal life.

This new pilot program is an in-house concierge service available at no fee to HFH Campus employees; you only pay for the items or services requested.

For those who follow Doc in the D, the concept of Midtown Concierge might sound familiar. Continue reading

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A Renovation Nearly 100 Years in the Making

The new Henry Ford Hospital surgical lounge, nearly 100 years in the making, is finally complete and open for business.

But first, let’s review some history.

New Henry Ford Hospital Surgical Lounge

New Henry Ford Hospital Surgical Lounge

As I noted in my previous blog post, Henry Ford Hospital is entering its 100th year of operation.

The iconic building on the Boulevard, whose designer was Albert Wood, a young architect on the payroll of Ford Motor Company, was constructed by Albert A. Albrecht Company.

Construction started in 1917 and, on Dec. 21, 1921, patients were admitted to the new section of Henry Ford Hospital, the base four floors of our current hospital. Continue reading

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Our Patients in 1915

This week marks the beginning of Henry Ford Hospital’s 100th year of operation.

A few weeks ago, I was given a bound log book documenting the first 50 patients who were admitted to Henry Ford Hospital.

We had always acknowledged Oct. 1, 1915 as the first day of patients being admitted to Henry Ford.

This date is true for the actual completed hospital beds in the private-room building of Henry Ford Hospital, which today we call the “M” building.

Medical record log for Henry Ford Hospital's first documented patient.

Medical record log for Henry Ford Hospital’s first documented patient.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few patients, however, were actually admitted before that date to the basement area of the hospital in open ward converted space — among them, our first documented patient, a stock handler with chronic back and leg pain and a morphine addiction, who was admitted on July 13, 1915.

The medical records are quite impressive.

The same cursive writing of Henry Ford Hospital that we use today is noted at the top of each page.

The handwriting is meticulous, and clearly not written by a physician with deplorable handwriting, such as myself. Continue reading

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Celebrating Our Nurses

The care and work done at a hospital is provided by a team of individuals, all of whom have an important, be it critical, role in our resultant services and outcomes.

Nurses Week 2014

Celebrating our nurses at Henry Ford Hospital.

But at the crossroads of all that is done in the hospital is a nurse.  Usually at the bedside, OR table, gurney, or examination table; the nurse is the linchpin of all that we do. 

All of the great work that I provided clinically and administratively could not have been done without the teamwork and collaboration of nursing. 

They’re a critical part of our health care team at Henry Ford, working long hours and providing expert care to our patients.

My partner in running this hospital, Ronnie Hall, is the same partner that I worked with to create one of the great intensive care units in our region; the Henry Ford Hospital Medical Intensive Care Unit.  Ronnie’s clinical instincts and organization skills that she honed at the bedside are the same talents that have made her a great hospital operational leader.

“Thank you” never seems enough when it comes to showing our appreciation for our nurses. Continue reading

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IDEAL: Advancing Surgical Innovation

Advances in health care happen in a variety of ways.

Sometimes they occur as a matter of necessity – the desperate attempt to save a life.

Sometimes they occur as a matter of luck – the “eureka” moment of discovery.

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Robotic kidney surgery at Henry Ford Hospital.

Most of the time they occur as a result of thoughtful innovation, development and assessment, and then tested for reliability and safety.

When you take a prescription or an over-the-counter drug, you probably don’t give very much thought as to how that particular medication came to be; you know what it does, potential side-effects and why you’re taking it.

But there’s a strong process in place for developing new drugs and making them available to the masses, to ensure quality, safety and effectiveness:

  • The drug manufacturer tests it and submits evidence through a “new drug application” to the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).
  • A team of CDER physicians, statisticians, chemists, pharmacologists, and other scientists then review the data provided in the application and propose labeling, should it be approved for use.
  • After that a clinical research process continues to test the validity of the studies and role of the medication in the treatment process.

Clear. Effective. Tested.

Ever wonder how the tracheostomy came to be a surgical method of treating an obstruction in the trachea?

The technique was clearly an innovation at the time. But it was not required to go through a randomized controlled trial or other strictures required of new prescription drugs and medical procedures.

You can take a drug “off label” for other uses – there’s a clear method for researching alternative uses and effectiveness as such.

Shouldn’t we have something similar in place for new surgical techniques? For surgical and procedural cases, the “off label” uses are not as clearly understood or often as rigorously scrutinized.

Once the “off label” procedure is proven to work, how do we ensure that it is safely performed by other surgeons and proceduralists? Continue reading

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The Tradition of National Doctors’ Day

National Doctors’ Day dates back to March 30, 1933 in Winder, Georgia, when Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decided to set a day aside to honor physicians.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

Dr. Gaetano Paone performing a TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) procedure.

It wasn’t until 60 years later that President George H.W. Bush signed Proclamation 6253, establishing National Doctors’ Day to “recognize our Nation’s physicians for their leadership in the prevention and treatment of illness and injury…”

Like the first observance in 1933, National Doctors’ day is still marked by patients thanking their physicians, mailing greeting cards, or sending flowers.

I want to take time to honor Dr. Hillier.  He delivered me and was our family physician when I was growing up in Troy in the 50’s.

In those days, Troy was a rural community and there were not a lot of doctors or health facilities there.  So, when we were sick, we went miles south on Rochester Road to the Palmer Woods area on Woodward to see Dr. Hillier.

I was very sick with tonsillitis.

My mom waited for my dad to come home from work, which was after 6 p.m. He took a look at me and said to call Dr. Hillier. Continue reading

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An “Edge” in Cancer Treatment

It is always nice to have an edge, an advantage, something in your favor.

Home court advantage or having a unique skill that helps to succeed over others is exactly what we want in a game – but also exactly what we want when we are facing the challenges in our health.

This week marked an exciting leap forward in giving all of us an “edge” in cancer treatment.

There’s now new technology designed to perform advanced, non-invasive cancer procedures anywhere in the body with extreme precision and low-toxicity.

And, I should mention that Henry Ford Hospital is the only location in North American – and among only two worldwide – equipped to give patients a new “edge” in the fight against cancer.

We are now home to the Edge Radiosurgery Suite, which uses new real-time tumor tracking technology and motion management capabilities, making it possible to protect healthy tissue with sub-millimeter accuracy, improving both safety and comfort for patients.

The Edge offers results comparable to surgery, but without the incision or hospital stay, treating patients in 15 minutes or less, and returning them to their everyday lives.

So when we say, “Game on Cancer,” we really mean it (and it’s not just because former Lions wide receiver Herman Moore attended the ribbon cutting for the Edge).

Herman Moore joins Drs. Siddique, Kalkanis, Conway, Movsas, Chapman and Bob Riney to officially launch the Edge.

Herman Moore joins Drs. Siddiqui, Kalkanis, Conway, Movsas, Chapman, and Bob Riney and myself to officially launch the Edge.

Herman is a perfect example of having an edge.

He was bigger, faster and better than defensive backs trying to stop him.  Megatron before Megatron.  He knows about the benefits of having an “edge.”

The Edge truly takes cancer radiation therapy to the next level.

And it’s no surprise that it’s happening here. Continue reading

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313 Day: Love for Detroit

#313DLove: Working at Henry Ford Hospital

#313DLove: Working at Henry Ford Hospital

“313 Day” has become an unofficial holiday in Detroit, growing in popularity during the past couple of years for offering Detroiters the chance to show their love and support for the city on March 13 (3-13).

The day trends on social media – across Detroit and beyond – with photos and inspiring words sporting the hashtags #313Day and #313DLove.

It’s a welcome break from the snow and Polar Vortex temperatures; an opportunity to focus on the positive and celebrate our city.

#313DLove: Detroit Made

#313DLove: Detroit Made

Since Detroit’s been our home for nearly 100 years, we have plenty to celebrate.

This is a day where “313” has no qualifiers.

You know what they are:

  • 313 is great, but…
  • 313 is fine for certain things, but…
  • 313 is coming back, but …

No “buts” on March 13.  

On 313 Day, we hosted a photo booth at the hospital so our employees could take part in the fun, showing the true spirit of the city, our history and bright future. Continue reading

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A Few Words on Colorectal Cancer

Can we talk?

I know it’s not a topic that you want to address, but people are dying not to talk about it.

That topic is your colon, specifically about colon cancer and how to improve diagnosis and cure of the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

Improving survival in this cancer is greatly increased by early detection and polyp removal by colonoscopy.

I know you may have a fear of this procedure.

Trust me; I wasn’t the first to step to the line either.

The preparation the day before is not quite as bad as the rumors, although it is important to stay close to a “facility.”

The procedure itself is painless, quick and easy. After mine, I asked the recovery nurse when we about to start – that was about 30 minutes after the procedure was finished. Continue reading

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The Heart of Henry Ford Hospital

February is American Heart Month, offering a remarkable opportunity to raise awareness about the country’s leading cause of death among both men and women, and to educate our community about preventing and controlling heart disease.

The Heart & Vascular team "Go Red" in support of women's heart health last Friday.

The Heart & Vascular team “Go Red” in support of women’s heart health last Friday.

With all of the work being done by our hospital team in support of American Heart Month, I wanted to take a moment to recognize the incredible work they do each and every day of the year to keep Henry Ford Hospital at the forefront of heart and vascular care and cutting-edge treatments.

Looking back on the past year, the Edith and Benson Ford Heart & Vascular Institute had some remarkable accomplishments.

Among our “firsts” in 2013:

- Performing a world-first transcaval TAVR to create a new route to the heart by temporarily connecting major blood vessels that do not normally intersect. The Structural Heart team, led by Dr. William O’Neill, is pioneering new methods to reach and repair damaged heart valves seemingly every day.

- First in the U.S. to implant an aortic replacement heart valve in the mitral valve. Continue reading

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